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Loss of Anti-Spike Antibodies Following mRNA Vaccination for COVID-19 Among Patients with Multiple Myeloma
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  • Samuel D. Stampfer,
  • Sean Bujarski,
  • Merissa-Skye Goldwater,
  • Scott Jew,
  • Bernard Sean Regidor,
  • Haiming Chen,
  • Ning Xu,
  • Mingjie Li,
  • Eddie Fung,
  • Regina A. Swift,
  • Bethany Beatty,
  • Shahrooz Eshaghian,
  • James Berenson, MD, Inc.
Samuel D. Stampfer
Emory University

Corresponding Author:s.stampfer@gmail.com

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Sean Bujarski
Institute for Myeloma and Bone Cancer Research
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Merissa-Skye Goldwater
Institute for Myeloma and Bone Cancer Research
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Scott Jew
Institute for Myeloma and Bone Cancer Research
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Bernard Sean Regidor
Berenson Cancer Center West Hollywood CA­
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Haiming Chen
Institute for Myeloma and Bone Cancer Research
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Ning Xu
Institute for Myeloma and Bone Cancer Research
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Mingjie Li
Institute for Myeloma and Bone Cancer Research
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Eddie Fung
Berenson Cancer Center West Hollywood CA­
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Regina A. Swift
Berenson Cancer Center West Hollywood CA­
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Bethany Beatty
Berenson Cancer Center West Hollywood CA­
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Shahrooz Eshaghian
Cedars Sinai Medical Center Division of Hematology and Oncology Los Angeles CA
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James Berenson, MD, Inc.
Institute for Myeloma and Bone Cancer Research
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Abstract

Background Multiple myeloma (MM) patients have variable responses to mRNA vaccination to COVID-19. Little is known regarding their vaccine-induced antibody levels over time. Methods We monitored spike IgG antibody levels over 24 weeks among a subset of 18 MM patients who showed a full response after two mRNA vaccinations. MM patients had a more rapid decline in antibody levels as compared to 8 healthy controls, with power law half-lives of 72 days (versus 107 days) and exponential half-lives of 37 days (versus 51 days). Results The patients with longer SARS-CoV-2 antibody half-lives were more likely to have undetectable monoclonal protein than those with shorter half-lives, suggesting better disease control may correlate with longer duration of vaccine-induced antibodies. Regardless, by 16 weeks post-second dose of mRNA vaccination, the majority of patients had antibody levels below 250 binding arbitrary units per milliliter, which would be unlikely to contribute significantly to preventing COVID-19. Conclusions Thus, even MM patients who respond adequately to vaccination are likely to require more frequent booster doses than the general population.
16 Nov 2022Submitted to Cancer Reports
18 Nov 2022Assigned to Editor
18 Nov 2022Submission Checks Completed
18 Nov 2022Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
18 Nov 2022Reviewer(s) Assigned