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Evaluation of Ventilator-Associated Tracheitis in Children with Pre-Existing Tracheostomies: Organisms and Empiric Coverage
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  • Victoria Urban,
  • Christopher Campbell,
  • Jennifer Waller,
  • Kelley Norris
Victoria Urban
Augusta University Medical Center
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Christopher Campbell
Children's Hospital of Georgia
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Jennifer Waller
Augusta University Medical Center
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Kelley Norris
Children's Hospital of Georgia
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Abstract

Evaluation of Ventilator-Associated Tracheitis in Children with Pre-Existing Tracheostomies: Organisms and Empiric Coverage Objectives: This study aims to describe the outcomes, microbiome, and empiric antimicrobial coverage of ventilator associated tracheitis (VAT) in pediatric patients with pre-existing tracheostomies. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients with pre-existing tracheostomies admitted to the Children’s Hospital of Georgia for initial inpatient treatment for VAT between January 1, 2007 and February 21, 2021. Patients were evaluated for incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP), tracheostomy culture results, and antibiotic choice. Results: Thirty-nine patients were included. Across all patients evaluated with pre-existing tracheostomies, 60% developed VAT. There was no difference in the development in VAP between shorter and longer treatment durations (0 vs 1, p = 1). Patients who developed Pseudomonas aeruginosa VAT were likely to have a previous culture of P. aeruginosa (p = 0.003), have a tracheostomy for longer (p = 0.011), and be older than 1 year of age (p = 0.0002). MRSA VAT was associated with a previous culture growing MRSA (p= 0.0042). Conclusions: VAT incidence was higher than what was shown in pediatric patients without pre-existing tracheostomies but VAP incidence was lower and there was no difference between treatment groups. VAT should be treated based on previous cultures and Pseudomonas aeruginosa should be considered as a causative organism.