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Comparing 1-year GUMICS-4 simulations of the Terrestrial Magnetosphere with Cluster Measurements
  • +13
  • Gabor Facsko,
  • David Gary Sibeck,
  • Ilja Honkonen,
  • József Bór,
  • German FARINAS PEREZ,
  • Anikó Timár,
  • Yuri Shprits,
  • Pyry Lauri Samuli Peitso,
  • Laura Degener,
  • Eija I Tanskanen,
  • Chandrasekhar Reddy Anekallu,
  • János Kalmár,
  • Szalai Sándor,
  • Arpad Kis,
  • Viktor Wesztergom,
  • Ákos Madár
Gabor Facsko
Wigner Research Centre for Physics

Corresponding Author:facsko.gabor@wigner.hu

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David Gary Sibeck
GSFC
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Ilja Honkonen
Finnish Meteorological Institute
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József Bór
Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science
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German FARINAS PEREZ
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
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Anikó Timár
Wigner Research Centre for Physics
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Yuri Shprits
GFZ Helmholtz Center Potsdam
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Pyry Lauri Samuli Peitso
Aalto University School of Electrical Engineering
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Laura Degener
Finnish Meteorological Institute,
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Eija I Tanskanen
Aalto University
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Chandrasekhar Reddy Anekallu
University College London
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János Kalmár
Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science
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Szalai Sándor
Institute of Earth Physics and Space Science
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Arpad Kis
Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences
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Viktor Wesztergom
Geodetic and Geophysical Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences
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Ákos Madár
Wigner Research Centre for Physics
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Abstract

We compare the predictions of the GUMICS-4 global magnetohydrodynamic model for the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth’s magnetosphere with Cluster SC3 measurements for over one year, from January 29, 2002, to February 2, 2003. In particular, we compare model predictions with the north/south component of the magnetic field (Bz) seen by the magnetometer, the component of the velocity along the Sun-Earth line (Vx), and the plasma density as determined from a top hat plasma spectrometer and the spacecraft’s potential from the electric field instrument. We select intervals in the solar wind, the magnetosheath, and the magnetosphere where these instruments provided good quality data and the model correctly predicted the region in which the spacecraft is located. We determine the location of the bow shock, the magnetopause and, the neutral sheet from the spacecraft measurements and compare these locations to those predicted by the simulation.
The GUMICS-4 model agrees well with the measurements in the solar wind however its accuracy is worse in the magnetosheath. The simulation results are not realistic in the magnetosphere. The bow shock location is predicted well, however, the magnetopause location is less accurate. The neutral sheet positions are located quite accurately thanks to the special solar wind conditions when the By component of the interplanetary magnetic field is small.