Building an application to simulate immersive visual scenes with rotational and translational gains for a user to interact with in the CAVE2.


Robert V. Kenyon, Ph.D.

Professor & Director of Graduate Studies

Department of Computer Science (M/C 152)

Secondary Committee Member

James Patton

Associate Professor

Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago

Spring 2014

UIN - 661096593


Leveraging the stereo 3D and the 320 degree field of vision of the CAVE2 to create visualisations which a participant can interact with. The visualisations are altered with different kinds of gains.This study tries to measure the lasting effect of these aberations to a persons vision and the possibility of these being sustained for a period of time after exposure. This would prove value in the approach which can be adopted in the future for other studies. The approach could also find its applications in the field of rehabilitation.


Traditionally, The only way to alter a persons vision was to create contraptions using mirrors, different kinds of lenses and other instruments, but with the evolution of VR systems such as the Head Mounted display, occulus rift and CAVE2, simulations can be created and due to the immersive nature of these devices, a persons visual system can be altered. In this study, we create a visualisation of a hallway and add rotational and translational gains to the perspective of a participant. The participant has to navigate through the hallway for a certain amount of time. He/She is headtracked and the visualisation changes based on his/her movements. The translation gain is necessary since we have to avoid the participant walking into the walls of the cave. We track the rotation about the y axis in real world (in the CAVE2) as well as the virtual world (in the Unity3D scene).