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Validation of the Urticaria Control Test (UCT) in Children with Chronic Urticaria
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  • Connor Prosty,
  • Sofianne Gabrielli,
  • Pasquale Mule,
  • Nuzha Noorah,
  • Sharon Baum,
  • Shoshana Greenberger,
  • LUIS FELIPE ENSINA,
  • Xun Zhang,
  • Elena Netchiporouk,
  • Moshe Ben-Shoshan
Connor Prosty
McGill University Health Centre
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Sofianne Gabrielli
McGill University Health Centre
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Pasquale Mule
McGill University Health Centre
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Nuzha Noorah
McGill University Health Centre
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Sharon Baum
Sheba Medical Center
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Shoshana Greenberger
Sheba Medical Center
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LUIS FELIPE ENSINA
Universidade Federal de São Paulo
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Xun Zhang
Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre
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Elena Netchiporouk
McGill University Health Centre
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Moshe Ben-Shoshan
McGill University
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Abstract

ABSTRACT Background No validated tools exist to evaluate chronic urticaria (CU) control in children. While the Urticaria Control Test (UCT) exhibits favourable clinometric properties in adult CU, it is not yet validated in children. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the validity of the UCT for the assessment of pediatric CU. Methods Children presenting with CU were consecutively recruited. Participants completed both the UCT and the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI). We assessed the internal consistency, convergent and known-groups validity, and screening accuracy of the UCT at study entry and at follow-up. Results A total of 52 children with CU were recruited. The UCT exhibited respectable internal consistency in the evaluation of CU (Cronbach’s α=0.73 [95%CI: 0.62, 0.85]). UCT and CDLQI scores strongly correlated (r=-0.74, P<0.01). The UCT distinguished between different strata of disease severities established by the CDLQI (P<0.01). Screening accuracy of the UCT was excellent in the discrimination of poorly controlled CU (area under the curve=0.82). An optimal cut-off of ≤10 was determined for defining poorly controlled CU (sensitivity=95.5%, specificity=63.3%). Data at follow-up were consistent with data at study entry. Conclusion The UCT is a valid tool for the assessment of pediatric CU and CSU, as evidenced by acceptable internal consistency, convergent and known-groups validity, and screening accuracy at multiple time points.