Auth

Hope How-Huan Chen

and 2 more

ABSTRACT. ρ Ophiuchii is a group of five B-stars, embedded in a nearby molecular cloud: Ophiuchus, at a distance of ∼ 119 pc. A “bubble”-like structure is found in dust thermal emission around ρ Oph. The circular structure on the Hα map further indicates that this bubble is physically connected to the source at the center. The goal of this paper is to estimate the impact of feedback from these embedded B-stars on the molecular cloud, by comparing the energy associated with the material entrained in the bubble to the total turbulent energy of the cloud. In this paper, we combine data from the COMPLETE Survey, which includes ¹²CO (1-0) and ¹³CO (1-0) molecular line emission from FCRAO, an extinction map derived from 2MASS near-infrared data using the NICER algorithm, and far-infrared data from IRIS (60/100 μm) with data from the Herschel Science Archive (PACS 100/160 μm and SPIRE 250/350/500 μm). With the wealth of data tracing different components of the cloud, we try to determine the best strategy to derive physical properties and to estimate the energy budget in the shell and in the cloud. We also experiment with the hierarchical Bayesian-fitting technique introduced by in an effort to eliminate the bias in the derived column densities and/or temperatures induced by noise in the far-IR data. We find that the energy entrained in the bubble is ∼ 12 % of the total turbulent energy of the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. This fraction is similar to the number give for the Perseus molecular cloud, and it suggests the non-negligible role of B-stars in driving the turbulence in clouds. We expect that a complete survey of “bubbles” in the Ophiuchus cloud will reveal the importance of B-star winds in molecular clouds.
Dear Professor Goodman, Thank you for agreeing to be our speaker at the Pappalardo Distinguished Lecture this fall. Below is a tentative schedule and lecture logistics for your talk. Tentative Schedule: Thursday, October 2, 2014 Noon – 1:00pm Lunch with undergraduate and graduate physics students (8-304) 3:20pm – 3:30pm Set-up presentation in lecture room (10-250) 3:30pm Cookie Social (4-349) 4:05pm Lecture (10-250) 6:00 – 9:00pm Pappalardo Lecture Dinner (Location tbd) Host: Your host is Professor Jesse Thaler (jthaler@MIT.EDU). Please let Prof. Thaler know if you have people in mind that you would like to see during your visit. For a list of MIT Physics faculty, please visit: http://web.mit.edu/physics/people/faculty/index.html Title and abstract: Please forward a short bio, headshot, talk title, and abstract by Monday, August 18, 2014. I have your affiliation listed as Harvard University; can you confirm that this is correct? Once I have this information, I can begin publicizing the event. I ask that you send me this information at your earliest convenience or by the date set forth above. Your colloquium will be publicized to the general community at MIT as well as through the Boston Area Physics Council. The content of your talk should be aimed at an advanced undergraduate level. Travel: Please let me know if I could be of assistance in arranging your travel to MIT’s campus. I can arrange for a parking spot near main campus if you need one. Audio-Visual: Please indicate any audio-visual items you will need for your talk. If you do not request items in advance, we cannot guarantee they will be available. The room is equipped with a LCD/CRT projector for laptop presentations, a wired microphone for the podium, a wireless lapel microphone, and a laser pointer. Please alert me to any additional needs. Filming: There is a possibility that we will be filming your talk to post onto an MIT website. If you have any questions regarding this, please let me know. Reimbursement: After your trip, please forward all itemized receipts either by PDF or snail mail to my address below. If you have any questions regarding your visit or need further information, please do not hesitate to contact me. Thank you, again, for agreeing to speak. We look forward to your talk. Regards, Nina Nina Wu I Events and Development Coordinator MIT, Department of Physics - 4-304 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02134 Tel: 617.253.6259 I Fax: 617.253.8554_Oh, an empty article!_ You can get started by DOUBLE CLICKING this text block and begin editing. You can also click the INSERT button below to add new block elements. Or you can DRAG AND DROP AN IMAGE right onto this text!
Candid5 pos vel

Cara Battersby

and 18 more

It has recently been proposed (Goodman et al. 2014) that long, skinny, infrared dark clouds may trace out the densest features of the Milky Way, which include spiral arms, and possible inter-arm tendrils. The features are so long and skinny that they are almost certainly caused and maintained by a global gravitational potential, so they are not likely to be self-gravitating molecular clouds. These “Bones of the Milky Way” could be used to help piece together the structure of the Galaxy, shedding light on age-old questions, such as the number of spiral arms in our Galaxy and their locations. We have searched for and identified a handful of candidate Bones: long, filamentary infrared-dark clouds found in position-velocity space where our current model of the Galaxy predicts spiral arms should lie. Utilizing archival data, we have confirmed the location of these Bone candidates in the Galactic mid-plane and within 5 km/s of a spiral arm. We propose to use the IRAM 30-m to create the first ever high-resolution CO map (1mm) of a candidate “Bone of the Milky Way,” simultaneously with a suite of dense gas tracers at 3mm with IRAM. Capitalizing on IRAM’s unique ability to map CO over large areas at high angular resolution while simultaneously obtaining kinematic information about the dense gas, we will provide the first measure of structure and kinematics toward these unique Galactic structures. Our total time request is XX hours to map XX sq. arcminutes at 1mm (¹³CO and C¹⁸O 2-1) and 3mm (HCO+, HCN 1-0, etc.) toward our most promising Northern-hemisphere candidate Bone, “BC1.”
Screenshot1

Alyssa Goodman

and 2 more

What famous observatory is more important than any other, yet has no lens, and no mirror? Is it Claudius Ptolemy's at Alexandria in the 2nd century AD? Maybe Uraniborg or Stjerneborg built by Tycho Brahe using 1% of the GDP of Denmark in the the 16th century? Nope. The answer is a creation of the 20th century: the internet. The ever-growing wealth of astronomical data available freely online literally holds answers to the mysteries of the Universe. The WorldWide Telescope is the telescope that lets any of us view the Universe using the internet as our observatory, to puzzle out those mysteries. The WorldWide Telescope is a "Universe Information System" that runs either online in a web browser, or in Windows, on almost any computer. It accesses the internet's amazing treasure-trove of online data to provide beautiful all-sky imagery at dozens of wavelengths, as well as detailed images of deep sky objects, and other astrophyscially important targets. In addition, it offers links to deeper information about objects, through links to diverse databases including Wikipedia and NASA's Astrophysics Data System, which holds all of the professional Astronomical literature since the 1800's. Users of WorldWide Telescope (also known as WWT) can create, share, and experience "Tours" of the Sky and of a three-dimesional model of the known Unvierse by saving special paths through the program. And those Tours can have musical scores, be narrated, conatin added imagery, and hyperlinks. Just imagine WWT as a web-browser for the sky. A sky-browser of sorts. Oh, and it's free.
Galileo

Alberto Pepe

and 1 more

INTRODUCTION In the early 1600s, Galileo Galilei turned a telescope toward Jupiter. In his log book each night, he drew to-scale schematic diagrams of Jupiter and some oddly-moving points of light near it. Galileo labeled each drawing with the date. Eventually he used his observations to conclude that the Earth orbits the Sun, just as the four Galilean moons orbit Jupiter. History shows Galileo to be much more than an astronomical hero, though. His clear and careful record keeping and publication style not only let Galileo understand the Solar System, it continues to let _anyone_ understand _how_ Galileo did it. Galileo’s notes directly integrated his DATA (drawings of Jupiter and its moons), key METADATA (timing of each observation, weather, telescope properties), and TEXT (descriptions of methods, analysis, and conclusions). Critically, when Galileo included the information from those notes in _Siderius Nuncius_ , this integration of text, data and metadata was preserved, as shown in Figure 1. Galileo's work advanced the "Scientific Revolution," and his approach to observation and analysis contributed significantly to the shaping of today's modern "Scientific Method" . Today most research projects are considered complete when a journal article based on the analysis has been written and published. Trouble is, unlike Galileo's report in _Siderius Nuncius_, the amount of real data and data description in modern publications is almost never sufficient to repeat or even statistically verify a study being presented. Worse, researchers wishing to build upon and extend work presented in the literature often have trouble recovering data associated with an article after it has been published. More often than scientists would like to admit, they cannot even recover the data associated with their own published works. Complicating the modern situation, the words "data" and "analysis" have a wider variety of definitions today than at the time of Galileo. Theoretical investigations can create large "data" sets through simulations (e.g. The Millennium Simulation Project). Large scale data collection often takes place as a community-wide effort (e.g. The Human Genome project), which leads to gigantic online "databases" (organized collections of data). Computers are so essential in simulations, and in the processing of experimental and observational data, that it is also often hard to draw a dividing line between "data" and "analysis" (or "code") when discussing the care and feeding of "data." Sometimes, a copy of the code used to create or process data is so essential to the use of those data that the code should almost be thought of as part of the "metadata" description of the data. Other times, the code used in a scientific study is more separable from the data, but even then, many preservation and sharing principles apply to code just as well as they do to data. So how do we go about caring for and feeding data? Extra work, no doubt, is associated with nurturing your data, but care up front will save time and increase insight later. Even though a growing number of researchers, especially in large collaborations, know that conducting research with sharing and reuse in mind is essential, it still requires a paradigm shift. Most people are still motivated by piling up publications and by getting to the next one as soon as possible. But, the more we scientists find ourselves wishing we had access to extant but now unfindable data , the more we will realize why bad data management is bad for science. How can we improve? THIS ARTICLE OFFERS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE STEPS SCIENTISTS CAN TAKE TO ENSURE THAT THEIR DATA AND ASSOCIATED ANALYSES CONTINUE TO BE OF VALUE AND TO BE RECOGNIZED. In just the past few years, hundreds of scholarly papers and reports have been written on questions of data sharing, data provenance, research reproducibility, licensing, attribution, privacy, and more--but our goal here is _not_ to review that literature. Instead, we present a short guide intended for researchers who want to know why it is important to "care for and feed" data, with some practical advice on how to do that. The set of Appendices at the close of this work offer links to the types of services referred to throughout the text. BOLDFACE LETTERING below highlights actions one can take to follow the suggested rules.
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_This post accompanies a talk by the same name and author, presented at the 223rd Meeting of the American Astronomical Society, at 11:40 AM on January 6, 2014. Talk slides will be online after noon on January 6 at http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/seamlessastronomy/presentations._ ABSTRACT In 1610, when Galileo pointed his small telescope at Jupiter, he drew sketches to record what he saw. After just a few nights of observing, he understood his sketches to be showing moons orbiting Jupiter. It was the visualization of Galileo's observations that led to his understanding of a clearly Sun-centered solar system, and to the revolution this understanding then caused. Similar stories can be found throughout the history of Astronomy, but visualization has never been so essential as it is today, when we find ourselves blessed with a larger wealth and diversity of data, per astronomer, than ever in the past. In this talk, I will focus on how modern tools for interactive “linked-view” visualization can be used to gain insight. Linked views, which dynamically update all open graphical displays of a data set (e.g. multiple graphs, tables and/or images) in response to user selection, are particularly important in dealing with so-called “high-dimensional data.” These dimensions need not be spatial, even though, e.g. in the case of radio spectral-line cubes or optical IFU data), they often are. Instead, “dimensions” should be thought of as any measured attribute of an observation or a simulation (e.g. time, intensity, velocity, temperature, etc.). The best linked-view visualization tools allow users to explore relationships amongst all the dimensions of their data, and to weave statistical and algorithmic approaches into the visualization process in real time. Particular tools and services will be highlighted in this talk, including: Glue (glueviz.org), the ADS All Sky Survey (adsass.org), WorldWide Telescope (worldwidetelescope.org), yt (yt-project.org), d3po (d3po.org), and a host of tools that can be interconnected via the SAMP message-passing architecture. The talk will conclude with a discussion of future challenges, including the need to educate astronomers about the value of visualization and its relationship to astrostatistics, and the need for new technologies to enable humans to interact more effectively with large, high-dimensional data sets.
Meatball

Alyssa Goodman

and 2 more

What famous observatory is more important than any other, yet has no lens, and no mirror? Is it Claudius Ptolemy's at Alexandria in the 2nd century AD? Maybe Uraniborg or Stjerneborg built by Tycho Brahe using 1% of the GDP of Denmark in the the 16th century? Nope. The answer is a creation of the 20th century: the internet. The ever-growing wealth of astronomical data available freely online literally holds answers to the mysteries of the Universe. The WorldWide Telescope is the telescope that lets any of us view the Universe using the internet as our observatory, to puzzle out those mysteries. The WorldWide Telescope is a "Universe Information System" that runs online in a web browser, or in Windows, on almost any computer or tablet. It accesses the internet's amazing treasure-trove of online data to provide beautiful all-sky imagery at dozens of wavelengths, as well as detailed images of deep sky objects, and other astrophyscially important targets. In addition, it offers links to in-depth information about objects, through links to diverse databases including Wikipedia and NASA's Astrophysics Data System, which holds all of the professional Astronomical literature since the 1800's. Users of WorldWide Telescope (also known as WWT) can create, share, and experience "Tours" of the Sky and of a three-dimesional model of the known Universe by saving paths through the program recorded as if by a virtual camera. These Tours look like video with musical scores, narration, additional imagery, and hyperlinks but are dramatically different in that you can interact and explore deeper and go anywhere at any time or pick up right where you left off! Just imagine WWT as an interactive web-browser for the sky. A sky-browser of sorts. Oh, and it's free.