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Study on The Mechanism of Lung and Intestinal Injury in Piglets Infected With PRV
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  • Xianghua Shu,
  • Chunlian Song,
  • Qiong Pan,
  • Xue Zhang,
  • Ying Zhang,
  • Yulei Wang,
  • Xin Huang,
  • Zhihui Zhang,
  • Yalun Zhang,
  • Yue Shu
Xianghua Shu
Yunnan Agricultural University

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Chunlian Song
Yunnan Agricultural University
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Qiong Pan
Yunnan Agricultural University
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Xue Zhang
Yunnan Agricultural University
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Ying Zhang
Yunnan Agricultural University
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Yulei Wang
Yunnan Agricultural University
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Xin Huang
Yunnan Agricultural University
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Zhihui Zhang
Yunnan Agricultural University
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Yalun Zhang
Yunnan Agricultural University
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Yue Shu
Auburn University Department of Biological Sciences
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Abstract

In order to explore the relationship between lung and intestinal injury and microorganisms in piglets caused by PRV infection.36 piglets were randomly divided into the blank group and the exposed group (or PRV group). PBS and PRV 1mL/Piggy were given by nasal drip at 0d, and the clinical symptoms were recorded every day. Three piglets in each group were sacrificed at 0d, 12h, 24h, 3d, 10d and 14d, respectively. The lungs, colon and contents were collected to observe the pathological sections and assess damage. The antigenic localization and expression of PRV, TLR4, NF-κB and MYD88 were detected by immunohistochemistry, the contents of sIgA, IFN-γ and IL-2 were determined by ELISA, and the microorganisms in lung and colon were analyzed by 16SrDNA. Accordingly, the correlation between lung and intestinal damage was highly significant (P<0.01). The expression of PRV in lung and colon was positively correlated with injury, with highly significant differences. The expression of TLR4, MYD88 and NF-κB was positively correlated with lung and intestinal injury. Besides, the levels of IFN-γ and sIgA were correlated with the injury, with significant differences. The species richness, diversity and evenness of microorganisms in lung and colon of the exposed group were reduced. There was a new Mycoplasma phylum in intestinal tract, and the correlation between lung flora and injury was higher than that in colon. In summary, it is evident that PRV infection with lung injury alters the intestinal TLR4-MYD88-NF-κB pathway, generating an inflammatory response, and lung and intestinal injury and microbial changes promote each other and drive disease progression.