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Giant mucinous cystadenoma at the Surgical Department of the State University Hospital of Haiti
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  • Axler Jean Paul,
  • Novensky Aurelien,
  • Gerald Vernelus,
  • Harry Junior Dujour
Axler Jean Paul
State University Hospital of Haiti

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Novensky Aurelien
State University Hospital of Haiti
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Gerald Vernelus
State University Hospital of Haiti
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Harry Junior Dujour
State University Hospital of Haiti
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Abstract

Giant tumors of the ovary are very rare. Mucinous Cystadenomas are the most common cause of these giant tumors and are often associated with digestive symptoms such as abdominal bloating, pain and nausea. The most incriminating risk factors are nulliparity, early puberty, menopause and infertility. A married postmenopausal woman aged 62 years, nulliparous (G0P0), known hypertensive for 24 years with history of myomectomy and unilateral oophorectomy, was seen at the surgical Department of the State University of Haiti (HUEH) for important increase of the abdomen. On arrival, she had an abdominal sonography describing a cystic mass with several septa and complex cystic pockets alternating with simple pockets. The mass was 46*31.7*26.4 cm in size and compress some abdominal organs. There was no ascites or adenopathy revealed. The blood screenings were within normal limits except for the liver enzymes which were slightly elevated: SGOT 48 IU/L and SGPT 39 IU/L. After evaluation it was concluded that she had a benign giant mucinous cystadenoma and was prepared for the operation room. In the OR, the abdomen was approached with a xipho-umbilical incision and after dissection of the different abdominal planes and opening of the peritoneum, a large polycystic mass was revealed. Citrin, clear fluid was aspirated from the septa to reduce the tension and then the mass was delivered.