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Primary Care Providers' Experiences Treating Low Back Pain
  • Sondos Sad,
  • Amanda Start
Sondos Sad
The Ohio State University

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Amanda Start
The Ohio State University
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Abstract

Abstract Objectives: To explore primary care provider (PCP) experiences and practice patterns regarding low back pain (LBP) in females compared to males in the United States. Methods: We used a cross-sectional study design; data was collected anonymously using a 27-item online survey disseminated via email to PCPs working in Ohio. We had 58 responses for analysis, data was analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Almost 9 out of 10 clinicians reported experiencing LBP. PCPs were not in agreement that LBP is different in women than men. Clinicians with women’s health, osteopathic, or sport’s medicine background were more likely to agree that LBP is different in women than in men. PCPs were more likely to counsel female patients about pelvic floor exercises; however, their intake of present pelvic symptoms in LBP female patients is suboptimal. PCPs were more likely to counsel females for home chores than males. Conclusion: Initial evidence suggests there is a knowledge gap amongst PCPs towards the impact of biological sex on LBP and a bias towards gender roles when counseling patients for home chores or occupational tasks. Further investigation of this knowledge gap and counseling approaches is recommended to better bridge the gender disparity.