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Vaccination uptake in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease: report from a large Brazilian referral center
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  • Daniel Jarovsky,
  • Phillipe Romanzini Bastos,
  • Samantha Faria de Matos,
  • Flávia Almeida,
  • Marco Aurélio Palazzi Sáfadi,
  • Izabella Campos Oliveira Hegg,
  • Silvia Luporini,
  • Eitan Naaman Berezin
Daniel Jarovsky
Santa Casa de São Paulo

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Phillipe Romanzini Bastos
Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo
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Samantha Faria de Matos
Santa Casa de São Paulo
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Flávia Almeida
Santa Casa de São Paulo
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Marco Aurélio Palazzi Sáfadi
Santa Casa de São Paulo
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Izabella Campos Oliveira Hegg
Santa Casa de São Paulo
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Silvia Luporini
Santa Casa de São Paulo
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Eitan Naaman Berezin
Santa Casa de São Paulo
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Abstract

Background: Brazil has one of the highest numbers of births with sickle cell disease in the Americas. Despite the risk of severe illnesses and death due to both vaccine-preventable viral and bacterial infections, the vaccination uptake in pediatric patients with SCD in Brazil is unknown. Material and methods: children under 18 years with SCD presenting to routine medical consultations at the Hematology Clinic had their vaccination status evaluated according to the national recommendations when each vaccine scheme was administered. Data obtained was classified in Adequate, Delayed, or Missing vaccination and compared younger children with older ones. Results: From 117 children screened, 100 had their vaccination card available. Vaccination coverage of routine vaccines was above 95% for all primary series and both age groups, with varied rates of delays and low missing doses. Among SCD extended vaccination, the most frequently delayed and missed vaccines were those specifically recommended to individuals with SCD as per national guidelines – and particularly those against encapsulated bacteria. Significant and varied rates of missing doses occurred in primary series and booster doses for PPSV23, Hib, menC, hepatitis A and varicella. The average influenza vaccination rate was 69.5%, with higher rates among younger children. Conclusions: by detecting alarming under-vaccination rates in children with SCD, we suggest the basic prevention strategies in Brazil should be reassessed in this specific population.