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Contraception Use Among Muslim Women in Alexandria, Egypt - a Descriptive Pilot Study
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  • Asmaa Namoos,
  • Maryam Abdelkarim,
  • Salma Zook,
  • Assem Khamis,
  • Norhan Bader,
  • Nour Eldin Abosamak,
  • Dina Ramadan,
  • Mostafa Abdou,
  • Rana Ramadan,
  • Ola Faried,
  • Abd El-Moneim Fawzy,
  • Tamas Gal
Asmaa Namoos
Virginia Commonwealth University

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Maryam Abdelkarim
Alexandria University Faculty of Medicine
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Salma Zook
Alexandria University Faculty of Medicine
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Assem Khamis
Hull York Medical School Centre for Biomedical Research
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Norhan Bader
American University of Beirut Medical Center
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Nour Eldin Abosamak
Alexandria University Faculty of Medicine
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Dina Ramadan
Alexandria University Faculty of Medicine
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Mostafa Abdou
Alexandria University Faculty of Medicine
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Rana Ramadan
Alexandria Medical School
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Ola Faried
Alexandria University Faculty of Medicine
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Abd El-Moneim Fawzy
Alexandria University Faculty of Medicine
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Tamas Gal
Virginia Commonwealth University
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Abstract

This pilot project explored knowledge, attitudes and practices related to contraception in Alexandria, Egypt using questionnaire assisted interviews. The goal of the study was to test and validate the survey instrument for a larger scale study. Methods: Participants were women randomly selected at outpatient clinics at Alexandria University Hospitals in September and October 2020. The inclusion criteria were to be 18 years or older female and to be able to give consent. The recruitment goal for this pilot study was 100 participants. The consented participants were interviewed using a questionnaire survey about demographics, socio-structural and contraceptive use. The questionnaire was tested before the interviews using a focus group of 11 randomly selected volunteer women who attended the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at the University of Alexandria in Egypt. Results: The age of study participants ranged from 18–60 with a mean of 34 years. Almost all participants had previously heard of various contraceptive methods and 75% used them before. The majority of the participants did not know about emergency contraception and believed that there was nothing to be done to prevent pregnancy after an unprotected sexual encounter. Most respondents had a favorable attitude toward family planning, and their main sources of information about the topic were family and friends. Conclusions: Preliminary findings show that most women knew about contraception methods, though not many of them heard of emergency contraception. Because of the patriarchal nature of Egyptian society, sexual health and family planning education should target the whole population.