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Short-term exposure to high temperature and salinity altered dead pericarp properties and diminished yield of the crop plant Brassica juncea
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  • Bupur Swetha,
  • Jeevan Singiri,
  • Nurit Novoplansky,
  • Rohith Grandhi,
  • Jansirani Srinivasan,
  • Janardan Khadka,
  • Noga Sikron-Persi,
  • Ivan Galis,
  • Gideon Grafi
Bupur Swetha
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
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Jeevan Singiri
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
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Nurit Novoplansky
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
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Rohith Grandhi
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
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Jansirani Srinivasan
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
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Janardan Khadka
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
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Noga Sikron-Persi
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
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Ivan Galis
Okayama University
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Gideon Grafi
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Abstract

Climate change is expected to increase the frequency and severity of abiotic stresses (e.g., hot spell, salinity, drought), which might lead to loss of crop yield. We investigated the effect of salinity (S), short episodes of high temperature (HS) and combination of S+HS at the reproductive phase on seeds and dead pericarps properties of the crop plant Brassica juncea. Three interval exposures to HS resulted in massive seed abortion, and seeds from salt-treated plants germinated poorly. HS significantly reduced metabolites accumulated in dead pericarps, except for upregulation of isomaltose and cellobiose. Salt induced alteration in metabolite levels including increase in proline, reduction in TCA intermediates and changes in phytohormone levels. Proteome analysis revealed hundreds of proteins stored in dead pericarps whose levels and composition were altered under salt stress. The integration of metabolic and proteomic data showed that changes in metabolites were highly correlated with changes in proteins involved in their biosynthetic pathways. Thus, dead pericarps store beneficial substances whose level and composition are altered under stress conditions. The results highlighted the detrimental effect of short episodes of HS during the reproductive phase on crop production, which might have implications for global food security in the face of climate change.