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Chronic bladder catheterization for precise urine collection in awake mice
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  • Alexander Andreev-Andrievskiy,
  • Evgeniia Lagereva,
  • Nadezda Pankova,
  • Mikhail Mashkin,
  • Vasily Manskikh,
  • Olga Frolova,
  • Olga Fadeeva,
  • Ekaterina Telyatnikova
Alexander Andreev-Andrievskiy
FSBSI State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation Institute of Medical and Biological Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Evgeniia Lagereva
FSBSI State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation Institute of Medical and Biological Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences
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Nadezda Pankova
FSBSI State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation Institute of Medical and Biological Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences
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Mikhail Mashkin
FSBSI State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation Institute of Medical and Biological Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences
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Vasily Manskikh
Institute of Mitoengineering MSU LLC
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Olga Frolova
Institute of Mitoengineering MSU LLC
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Olga Fadeeva
Institute of Mitoengineering MSU LLC
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Ekaterina Telyatnikova
Institute of Mitoengineering MSU LLC
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Abstract

Background and Purpose Metabolic chambers are routinely used for urine collection in rodents. In mice, due to small urination volume, evaporation in the metabolic chambers distorts diuresis and urinalysis parameters. We have developed a new technique of chronic bladder catheterization enabling long-term accurate and contamination-free urine collection in awake male and female mice. The study was aimed to illustrate its validity for long-term monitoring of diuresis, pharmacological and pharmacokinetic applications. Experimental Approach Urine was collected in male and female mice implanted with bladder catheters or using the metabolic chambers for 30 days, at 1 h resolution to estimate diurnal variation or at 10 min resolution after water load, desmopressin, furosemide or phenol red administration. Key Results Urine recovery in the metabolic cages drops to 50 % at the typical murine urination volume. Daily diuresis in catheterized mice is more than twice higher as compared to the metabolic cages. The twofold differences in urine flow rate are preserved when the circadian variation of diuresis, the effects of furosemide, desmopressin and water load are estimated using the two techniques. Reliable pharmacokinetic curves for phenol red (90 % recovery) were obtained in catheterized mice. Urine osmolarity, urinalysis and microbiological parameters evidence higher quality of the catheter-collected urine. 30 days after the surgery catheters were patent and had minimal impact on the animals’ heath. Conclusion and Implications Bladder catheterization is a useful tool for pharmacological and toxicological studies that require urine collection in mice.