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The risk factors of hemorrhoidal disease: a Mendelian randomization study
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  • Yu Miaozhi,
  • Yu MZ,
  • Shang Y,
  • Han LL
Yu Miaozhi
Dalian University Affiliated Xinhua Hospital

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Yu MZ
Dalian University Affiliated Xinhua Hospital
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Shang Y
Dalian University Affiliated Xinhua Hospital
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Han LL
Dalian University Affiliated Xinhua Hospital
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Abstract

Hemorrhoids are the most common perianal disease, but current observational studies have yielded inconsistent results in investigating the etiology. Our further exploration of the etiology will help prevent the disease. We conducted a two-sample bidirectional Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis using publicly available genome-wide association studies (GWAS) statistics from multiple consortia. The inverse-variance weighted (IVW) method was used for the primary analysis. We applied four complementary methods, including weighted median, weighted mode, MR-Egger regression, and Cochrane’s Q value, to detect and correct the effects of horizontal pleiotropy. Genetically determined constipation (OR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.91-1.03, P = 0.28) and diarrhea (OR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.99-1.01, P = 0.90) did not have a causal effect on HEM but stool frequency (OR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.05-1.55, P = 0.01), waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.06-1.64, P = 1.59×10 -5), and order Burkholderiales (OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.04–1.14, p = 1.63×10 -4) had a causal effect on. Furthermore, we found a significant causal effect of constipation on HEM in the reverse MR analysis (OR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.13-1.28, P = 3.72×10 -9). The results of MR-Egger regression, Weighted Median, and Weighted Mode methods were consistent with those of the IVW method. Horizontal pleiotropy was unlikely to distort the causal estimates, as indicated by the sensitivity analysis. Our MR analysis reveals a causal association between stool frequency and waist-to-hip ratio with HEM, despite variations in results reported by observational studies. Unexpectedly, we found a relationship between the order Burkholderiales in the gut flora and HEM, although the mechanism is unclear.