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Screening for Atrial Fibrillation: Risks, Benefits, and implications on future clinical practice.
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  • Muhammad Haris Ilyas,
  • Amaan Mohammad Sharih,
  • Jamila Tukur Jido,
  • Abdul Rahman Zulfiqar Ali,
  • Ava Khoshnaghsh,
  • Mehak Nadeem,
  • Syeda Anum Zahra
Muhammad Haris Ilyas
University of Leeds School of Medicine
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Amaan Mohammad Sharih
University of Birmingham College of Medical and Dental Sciences
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Jamila Tukur Jido
University of Leeds School of Medicine
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Abdul Rahman Zulfiqar Ali
Imperial College London Faculty of Medicine
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Ava Khoshnaghsh
King's College London Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine
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Mehak Nadeem
Imperial College London Faculty of Medicine
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Syeda Anum Zahra
Imperial College London Faculty of Medicine

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Abstract

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in clinical practice. The prevalence of AF is known to be constantly rising due to an overall increased ageing population with multiple co-morbidities in the Western world, predisposing to debilitating complications such as stroke and coronary artery disease (CAD). Therefore, there has been a great interest in improving clinical outcomes for these patients. Hence, various screening strategies have come into guidelines in order to identify individuals at an increased risk of AF and its complications. It is speculated that assessment of risk factors using various screening tools will aid in improving outcomes and reducing AF-related complications. Thereby, there has been a recognised need for investigating the diagnostic accuracy of key index tests in the diagnosis and management of AF.