loading page

Genome of Alectoris chukar provide insights into its domestication, adaptation, and origin
  • +20
  • Hao Zhou*,
  • Xunhe Huang*,
  • Jiajia Liu,
  • Jinmei Ding,
  • Ke Xu,
  • Wenqi Zhu,
  • Chuan He,
  • Lingyu Yang,
  • Jianshen Zhu,
  • Chengxiao Han,
  • Chao Qin,
  • Huaixi Luo,
  • Kangchun Chen,
  • Shenyao Jiang,
  • Yurou Shi,
  • Jinyuan Zeng,
  • Zhuoxian Weng,
  • Yongjie Xu,
  • Qing Wang,
  • Ming Zhong,
  • Bingwang Du#,
  • Sen Song#,
  • He Meng#
Hao Zhou*
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Author Profile
Xunhe Huang*
JiaYing University
Author Profile
Jiajia Liu
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Author Profile
Jinmei Ding
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Author Profile
Ke Xu
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Author Profile
Wenqi Zhu
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Author Profile
Chuan He
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Author Profile
Lingyu Yang
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Author Profile
Jianshen Zhu
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Author Profile
Chengxiao Han
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Author Profile
Chao Qin
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Author Profile
Huaixi Luo
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Author Profile
Kangchun Chen
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Author Profile
Shenyao Jiang
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Author Profile
Yurou Shi
Lanzhou University
Author Profile
Jinyuan Zeng
Lanzhou University
Author Profile
Zhuoxian Weng
Jiaying University
Author Profile
Yongjie Xu
Jiaying University
Author Profile
Qing Wang
Jiaying University
Author Profile
Ming Zhong
Jiaying University
Author Profile
Bingwang Du#
Jiaying University

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

Author Profile
Sen Song#
Shool of Life Sciences

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

Author Profile
He Meng#
Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

Author Profile

Abstract

Alectoris chukar (chukar) is the most widespread partridge species in the world, adapting well to a variety of ecological settings. Like chickens and other poultries, chukars have been domesticated in recent decades to provide meat and eggs. Here we sequenced and assembled a high-quality, phased-resolved chukar genome, composed of 31 pairs of relatively complete diploid chromosomes. Genome resequencing and population genomic analyses of five wild subspecies and one domestic population provide insights into chukar domestication, population structure, and adaptive evolution. The results of linkage disequilibrium are consistent with chukars having weaker domestication than domestic chickens that experienced intensive domestication. Compared to chicken, chukar has a specific organization of MHC-B genes, indicating that chukar has particular immunological adaptability. Notably, we also provided evidence that wild chukar in China may be originated from the North China subspecies and domestic chukar may be originated from falki in China. Overall, our study provides valuable genomic resources for bird research and conservation and offers insights into chukar domestication, origin, and adaptation.