loading page

Roadside disturbance promotes arbuscular mycorrhizal communities in mountain regions worldwide
  • +18
  • Jan Clavel,
  • Jonas Lembrechts,
  • Jonathan Lenoir,
  • Sylvia Haider,
  • Keith McDougall,
  • Martin Nuñez,
  • Jake Alexander,
  • Agustina Barros,
  • Ann Milbau,
  • Tim Seipel,
  • Anibal Pauchard,
  • Eduardo Fuentes-Lillo,
  • Amanda Ratier Backes,
  • Pervaiz Dar,
  • zafar reshi,
  • Alla Aleksanyan,
  • Shengwei Zong,
  • J. R. Arevalo,
  • Valeria Aschero,
  • Erik Verbruggen,
  • Ivan Nijs
Jan Clavel
University of Antwerp
Author Profile
Jonas Lembrechts
University of Antwerp

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

Author Profile
Jonathan Lenoir
Université de Picardie Jules Verne
Author Profile
Sylvia Haider
Martin Luther University Halle Wittenberg
Author Profile
Keith McDougall
La Trobe University
Author Profile
Martin Nuñez
University of Houston
Author Profile
Jake Alexander
Universite de Lausanne
Author Profile
Agustina Barros
CONICET Mendoza
Author Profile
Ann Milbau
Climate Impacts Research Centre (CIRC)
Author Profile
Tim Seipel
Montana State University
Author Profile
Anibal Pauchard
Universidad de Concepcion
Author Profile
Eduardo Fuentes-Lillo
University of Concepción
Author Profile
Amanda Ratier Backes
Martin-Luther-Universitat Halle-Wittenberg
Author Profile
Pervaiz Dar
University of Kashmir
Author Profile
zafar reshi
University of Kashmir
Author Profile
Alla Aleksanyan
Institute of Botany National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Armenia
Author Profile
Shengwei Zong
Northeast Normal University
Author Profile
J. R. Arevalo
Universidad de La Laguna
Author Profile
Valeria Aschero
CONICET Mendoza
Author Profile
Erik Verbruggen
University of Antwerp
Author Profile
Ivan Nijs
University of Antwerp
Author Profile

Abstract

Aim: We aimed to assess the impact at the global level of physical anthropogenic disturbances on the dominant mycorrhizal types in ecosystems and how this mechanism can potentially lead to lasting plant community changes. Location: Globally distributed study regions Time Period: 2007-2018 Taxa studied: Plants and mycorrhizal fungi Methods: We used a database of coordinated plant community surveys following mountain roads from 894 plots in 11 mountain regions across the globe in combination with a database of mycorrhizal-plant associations in order to estimate the relative abundance of mycorrhizal types in natural and disturbed environments. Results: Our findings show that roadside disturbance promotes the cover of plants associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. This effect is especially strong in colder mountain environments and in mountain regions where plant communities are dominated by ectomycorrhizal (EcM) or ericoid-mycorrhizal (ErM) associations. Furthermore, non-native plant species, which we confirmed to be mostly AM plants, are more successful in environments dominated by AM associations. Main Conclusions: These biogeographical patterns suggest that changes in mycorrhizal types are a crucial factor in the worldwide impact of anthropogenic disturbances on mountain ecosystems by promoting AM-dominated systems and potentially weakening biotic resistance against non-native species invasion. Restoration efforts in mountain ecosystems will have to contend with changes in the fundamental make-up of EcM- and ErM plant communities induced by roadside disturbance.
10 Aug 2023Submitted to Ecography
12 Aug 2023Assigned to Editor
12 Aug 2023Submission Checks Completed
12 Aug 2023Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
19 Aug 2023Reviewer(s) Assigned
26 Oct 2023Editorial Decision: Revise Major