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Patterns of aeroallergen sensitisation at a tertiary paediatric hospital in Sydney, Australia.
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  • Shruti Swamy,
  • Danyi Dai,
  • Dianne Campbell,
  • Connie Katelaris
Shruti Swamy
The Children's Hospital at Westmead

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Danyi Dai
The Children's Hospital at Westmead
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Dianne Campbell
The Children's Hospital at Westmead
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Connie Katelaris
Campbelltown Hospital
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Abstract

Objective: To examine patterns of aeroallergen sensitisation in atopic children and adolescents from a tertiary paediatric hospital in Sydney, NSW. Method: Retrospective cross-sectional study of atopic children who underwent aeroallergen skin testing (SPT) at a tertiary children’s hospital (May 2013-Dec 2014). Participants were eligible where all the following aeroallergens were tested including; Rye, Bahia, Bermuda, English plantain, house dust mite (D.pteronyssinus and D.farinae), cat, dog and Alternaria and they had a positive SPT to at least one allergen (≥3mm). Results: 517 participants were included, with a median age of 9.2 years (IQR 6.3-11.4). The most common sensitisation was HDM (90%), with Rye grass (45%) being the most common grass pollen. 93% of participants were polysensitised (>1 allergen), with number of aeroallergen sensitisations increasing with age (Pr>ChiSq <0.0001). Preschool children were predominantly sensitised to HDM, with lower rates of grass sensitisation, compared with the teenage group who had similar rate of HDM sensitisation, but higher rates of grass sensitisation. Based on history of atopic dermatitis, asthma, allergic rhinitis, the largest proportion of Alternaria sensitisation was observed in participants with atopic dermatitis, and the largest proportion of pollen sensitisation in participants with allergic rhinitis. Conclusion: In this cohort, sensitisation with HDM and grass pollen was the most common; most participants were polysensitized, which increased with age. Overall these patterns were similar to those described in paediatric populations globally, particularly in temperate regions.