loading page

Transcriptomic responses in the nervous system and correlated behavioural changes of a cephalopod exposed to ocean acidification
  • +3
  • Jodi Thomas,
  • Roger Huerlimann,
  • Celia Schunter,
  • Sue-Ann Watson,
  • Philip Munday,
  • Timothy Ravasi
Jodi Thomas
Marine Climate Change Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Okinawa, Japan, Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

Author Profile
Roger Huerlimann
Marine Climate Change Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Okinawa, Japan
Author Profile
Celia Schunter
Swire Institute of Marine Science, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong SAR
Author Profile
Sue-Ann Watson
Biodiversity and Geosciences Program, Museum of Tropical Queensland, Queensland Museum Network, Townsville, Queensland 4810, Australia, College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
Author Profile
Philip Munday
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
Author Profile
Timothy Ravasi
Marine Climate Change Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Okinawa, Japan
Author Profile

Abstract

The nervous system is central to coordinating behavioural responses to environmental change, likely including ocean acidification (OA). However, a clear understanding of neurobiological responses to OA is lacking, especially for marine invertebrates. We evaluated the transcriptomic response of the central nervous system (CNS) and eyes of the two-toned pygmy squid (Idiosepius pygmaeus) to OA conditions, using a de novo transcriptome assembly created with long read PacBio ISO-sequencing data. We then correlated patterns of gene expression with CO2 treatment levels and OA-affected behaviours in the same individuals. OA induced transcriptomic responses within the nervous system related to various different types of neurotransmission, neuroplasticity, immune function and oxidative stress. These molecular changes may contribute to OA-induced behavioural changes, as suggested by correlations between gene expression profiles, CO2 treatment and OA-affected behaviours. This study provides the first molecular insights into the neurobiological effects of OA on a cephalopod and correlates molecular changes with whole animal behavioural responses, helping to bridge the gap in our knowledge between environmental change and animal responses.
26 Jul 2023Submitted to Molecular Ecology
28 Jul 2023Assigned to Editor
28 Jul 2023Submission Checks Completed
28 Jul 2023Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
11 Aug 2023Reviewer(s) Assigned