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Effect of Inverted Visual Velocity Profile on Vestibular Heading Perception.
  • Miguel Yakouma,
  • Eric Anson,
  • Benjamin Crane
Miguel Yakouma
University of Rochester
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Eric Anson
University of Rochester
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Benjamin Crane
University of Rochester

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Abstract

Visual motion is ambiguous in that it can either represent object motion or self-motion. Visual-vestibular integration is most advantageous during self-motion. The current experiment tests the hypothesis that the visual motion needs to have a motion profile consistent with the inertial motion. To test this we compared the effect on heading perception when the visual stimulus was consistent with the inertial motion and compared this to the condition when the visual stimulus was inverted and was thus inconsistent with inertial motion. Twenty healthy human subjects (mean age 20 ± 3 years, 13 female) experienced 2 s of translation which they reported as left or right. A synchronized 2 s visual heading was offset by 0°, ±45°, ±60°, or ±75°. In randomly interleaved trials the visual motion was consistent with the inertial motion or inverted – it started at the peak velocity, decreased to zero mid-stimulus, then accelerated back to the peak velocity. When the velocity profile of the visual stimulus matched the velocity profile of inertial motion the inertial stimulus was biased 10.0 ± 1.8° (mean ± SE) with a 45° visual offset, 8.9 ± 1.7° with a 60° offset and 9.3° ± 2.5 ± with a 75° offset. When the visual stimulus was inverted so it was inconsistent with the inertial motion the respective biases were 6.5 ± 1.5°, 5.6 ± 1.7°, and 5.9 ± 2.0°. Thus, the biases with the inverted stimulus were significantly smaller (p < 0.0001), demonstrating that visual motion profile is consider in multisensory integration.