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Life stage affects the gut microbiota structure of Locusta migratoria
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  • Wenjing Li,
  • Kai Li,
  • Ke Liang,
  • Feifei Li,
  • GuoQing Qin,
  • Jia Hao Liu,
  • YuLong Zhang,
  • Xin-Jiang LI
Wenjing Li
Hebei University
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Kai Li
Hebei University
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Ke Liang
Hebei University
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Feifei Li
Hebei University
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GuoQing Qin
Hebei University
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Jia Hao Liu
Hebei University
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YuLong Zhang
Hebei University
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Xin-Jiang LI
Hebei University

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Abstract

Gut microbes play an essential role in the nutritional metabolism of insects. In particular, they are critical to host health when challenged with toxic substances, pathogens, or parasites. Therefore, gut microbiota is a potential resource for developing microbial products for pest control and management. Insect gut microbiota vary across the life cycle, and successful application of microbes for pest control requires precision in specific insect developmental stages. However, the dynamic processes of gut microbiota are poorly understood, and the complexity of ecological factors affecting gut microbiota and the nature of the interactions have been little studied in natural populations. In this study, we combined quantitative characterisation of microbial community diversity, taxonomic analysis of microbial communities, and functional prediction to explore gut microbiota dynamics of Locusta migratoria throughout its life cycle. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the dominant phyla throughout the life stages of Locusta migratoria; Enterobacter, Pseudocitrobacter, and Enterococcus were consistently present throughout all life stages. Weissella, which is associated with grasshopper aggregation, was significantly higher in L1 and L2 than in the other life stages. In addition, we analysed the functions of the dominant bacterial flora of Locusta migratoria to screen for new control grasshopper gut bacteria. Identifying and interpreting the various ecological sources that shape individual gut bacteria is essential for understanding the role of gut microbiota in animal health. Moreover, the results of this study provide potential targets for future control of harmful grasshoppers and lays the theoretical foundation for pest control.