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Validation of the Safety Behavior Assessment Form -- PTSD Scale
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  • Jason Goodson,
  • Jacek Brewczynski,
  • Lucas Baker,
  • Gerald Haeffel,
  • Caleb Woolston,
  • Anu Asnaani,
  • Erika M. Roberge
Jason Goodson
VA Salt Lake City Health Care System Mental Health Services

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Jacek Brewczynski
VA Salt Lake City Health Care System Mental Health Services
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Lucas Baker
VA Salt Lake City Health Care System Mental Health Services
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Gerald Haeffel
University of Notre Dame Department of Psychology
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Caleb Woolston
University of Utah Hospital
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Anu Asnaani
University of Utah Hospital
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Erika M. Roberge
VA Salt Lake City Health Care System Mental Health Services
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Abstract

Safety behaviors are core cognitive and behavioral components involved in the onset, maintenance, and treatment of anxiety-related disorders. Yet, these behaviors remain understudied in the context of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This may be due, in part, to the lack of psychometrically valid instruments designed to evaluate safety behaviors, particularly those relevant to the diagnosis of PTSD. Furthermore, there is an absence of PTSD-related safety behavior measures with the brevity necessary for continuous measurement-based care during treatment. Our research aims to investigate the psychometric characteristics of the newly formed PTSD scale of the Safety Behavior Assessment form (SBAF-PTSD) through three studies. The first study examined SBAF-PTSD factorial validity via confirmatory factor analyses (CFA), along with other psychometric properties. Results identified a 10-item bi-factor model that reflects a primary Safety Behavior scale and a secondary, latent construct labeled SBAF-PTSD Social Index. The newly revised SBAF-PTSD scale was then used in an effectiveness study to investigate its clinical utility in the context of PTSD treatment. The third study sought to generalize our results to non-clinical samples. The results of the studies are discussed in terms of their implications for the use of the new PTSD-SBAF measure.