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Contradicting effects of subjective economic and cultural values on ocean protection willingness: preliminary evidence of 42 countries
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  • Quang-Loc Nguyen,
  • Minh-Hoang Nguyen,
  • Tam-Tri Le,
  • Thao-Huong Ma,
  • Ananya Singh,
  • Phuong-Duong Minh,
  • Quan-Hoang Vuong
Quang-Loc Nguyen
SP Jain School of Global Management - Sydney Campus
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Minh-Hoang Nguyen
Phenikaa University

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Tam-Tri Le
Phenikaa University
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Thao-Huong Ma
Western Sydney University
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Ananya Singh
SP Jain School of Global Management - Sydney Campus
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Phuong-Duong Minh
Ton Duc Thang University
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Quan-Hoang Vuong
Phenikaa University
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Abstract

Coastal protection is crucial to human development since the ocean has many values associated with the economy, ecosystem, and culture. However, most ocean-protecting efforts are currently ineffective due to the burdens of finance, lack of appropriate management, and international cooperation regimes. For aiding bottom-up initiatives for ocean protection support, this study employed the Mindsponge Theory to examine how the public’s perceived economic and cultural values influence their willingness to support actions to protect the ocean. Analyzing the European-Union-Horizon-2020-funded dataset of 709 respondents from 42 countries, we discovered that perceived economic values have negative effects on the tendency of ocean protection supports (i.e., food, transportation, renewable energy, oil and gas, and recreation). In contrast, certain perceived cultural values can help increase the willingness to do so (i.e., mental well-being and sense of identity). However, the effects of perceived cultural values are only moderately reliable. These findings suggest that designing cultural information delivery campaigns can help promote coastal reserve supports, such as fundraisings and preserving the oceans from the community.