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Introducing 'DeNIS': a global database on anthropogenic marine Debris and Non-Indigenous Species
  • +14
  • João Canning-Clode,
  • Rúben Freitas,
  • Peter Barry,
  • Katja Broeg,
  • James T Carlton,
  • Gordon H Copp,
  • Phil Davison,
  • Francesca Gizzi,
  • Maiju Lehtiniemi,
  • João G Monteiro,
  • Patrício Ramalhosa,
  • Sabine Rech,
  • Macarena Ros,
  • Gregory M Ruiz,
  • Thomas Therriault,
  • Martin Thiel,
  • Marko Radeta
João Canning-Clode
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, USA, MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre / ARNET - Aquatic Research Network, Agência Regional para o Desenvolvimento da Investigação Tecnologia e Inovação (ARDITI), Madeira Island, Portugal
Rúben Freitas
Wave Labs, Faculty of Exact Sciences and Engineering, University of Madeira, Portugal, MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre / ARNET - Aquatic Research Network, Agência Regional para o Desenvolvimento da Investigação Tecnologia e Inovação (ARDITI), Madeira Island, Portugal
Peter Barry
Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), UK
Katja Broeg
Bundesamt für Seeschifffahrt und Hydrographie, Hamburg, Germany
James T Carlton
Williams College – Mystic Seaport, Mystic, USA
Gordon H Copp
Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), UK
Phil Davison
Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), UK
Francesca Gizzi
MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre / ARNET - Aquatic Research Network, Agência Regional para o Desenvolvimento da Investigação Tecnologia e Inovação (ARDITI), Madeira Island, Portugal
Maiju Lehtiniemi
Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki, Finland
João G Monteiro
Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Madeira, Portugal, MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre / ARNET - Aquatic Research Network, Agência Regional para o Desenvolvimento da Investigação Tecnologia e Inovação (ARDITI), Madeira Island, Portugal
Patrício Ramalhosa
MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre / ARNET - Aquatic Research Network, Agência Regional para o Desenvolvimento da Investigação Tecnologia e Inovação (ARDITI), Madeira Island, Portugal
Sabine Rech
Center for Ecology and Sustainable Management of Oceanic Islands (ESMOI), Universidad Católica del Norte, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad Católica del Norte
Macarena Ros
Facultad de Biología, Universidad de Sevilla, Spain
Gregory M Ruiz
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, USA
Thomas Therriault
Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Nanaimo, BC, Canada
Martin Thiel
Center for Advanced Studies in Arid Systems (CEAZA), Coquimbo, Chile, Center for Ecology and Sustainable Management of Oceanic Islands (ESMOI), Universidad Católica del Norte, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad Católica del Norte
Marko Radeta
Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade, Serbia, Wave Labs, Faculty of Exact Sciences and Engineering, University of Madeira, Portugal, MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre / ARNET - Aquatic Research Network, Agência Regional para o Desenvolvimento da Investigação Tecnologia e Inovação (ARDITI), Madeira Island, Portugal

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

Author Profile

Abstract

Anthropogenic marine debris (AMD) poses a major threat to marine life, biodiversity, and ecosystems, which is particularly alarming due to its growing abundance, durability, and persistence in the marine environment. In addition to well-studied impacts on marine organisms' health and survival, recent research indicates an additional but less obvious impact: AMD facilitates long-distance and even transoceanic dispersal, acting increasingly as a vector for transport and introduction of non-indigenous species (NIS) globally. AMD may facilitate new introductions but also promote secondary spread of invasions, compounding even further its ecological impact in marine ecosystems. Around the world, opportunistic and targeted sampling has already provided extensive information on marine debris as a vector and the associated species. However, the information is mostly scattered and with no systematic organization or curation. In this context, we launched 'DeNIS': a global database on marine Debris and Non-Indigenous Species designed to compile crucial information on AMD and its epibionts. DeNIS was developed on an easy-to-use platform for data synthesis and functional visuals, integrating past and ongoing measures, and includes a back-office interface for data gathering, classification and rigorous analysis.