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Otolith radiocarbon signatures provide distinct migration history of walleye pollocks around Hokkaido, Japan in the North-Western Pacific
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  • Kozue Ando,
  • Yusuke Yokoyama,
  • Yosuke Miyairi,
  • Osamu Sakai,
  • Tomonori Hamatsu,
  • Yuuho Yamashita,
  • Masayuki Chimura,
  • Toshi Nagata
Kozue Ando
The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Science Faculty of Science

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Yusuke Yokoyama
The University of Tokyo
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Yosuke Miyairi
The University of Tokyo Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute
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Osamu Sakai
Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency
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Tomonori Hamatsu
Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency
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Yuuho Yamashita
Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency
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Masayuki Chimura
Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency
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Toshi Nagata
The University of Tokyo
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Abstract

1. Otoliths have been widely studied as natural recorders of the entire life cycle of aquatic teleosts. Trace elements and stable isotope rations in otoliths are well understood and used as proxies of migration histories, however few elements have shown the potential to reconstruct the migration history of oceanodromous fish. 2. This study reports the first use of radiocarbon in otolith to reconstruct the horizontal migration history of fish. We analyzed three different stocks of walleye pollock Gadus chalcogrammus around Hokkaido, Japan. 3. Radiocarbon concentration from the outermost edge of otoliths showed a general consistency with seawater radiocarbon concentration of the sampling region, validating the application of otolith radiocarbon concentration to fish migration studies. Pollocks of all three stocks generally inhabited the nearby sampling area throughout their life cycle, though some pollocks of the Okhotsk and Japan Sea stocks respectively showed a possibility of migration between different sea regions. 4. This study confirmed a novel method using radiocarbon concentrations to reconstruct the migration history of marine teleost. Using the high sensitivity of otolith radiocarbon concentration observed in this study, it may be possible to detect fish migration with higher spatial resolution than previous studies using conventional proxies.
12 Apr 2023Submitted to Ecology and Evolution
13 Apr 2023Assigned to Editor
13 Apr 2023Submission Checks Completed
13 Apr 2023Reviewer(s) Assigned
30 May 2023Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
08 Jun 2023Editorial Decision: Revise Minor