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Determinants and Constraints to Adoption of Soil Conservation Practices among Small-holder Farmers in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo
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  • Nsharwasi Léon Nabahungu,
  • Neville Mapenzi,
  • Paul-Martin Dontsop Nguezet,
  • Serge Amato Masirika,
  • Akonkwa Nyamuhirwa Dieu-Merci,
  • Jacob Mignouna
Nsharwasi Léon Nabahungu
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Neville Mapenzi
Kenyatta University
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Paul-Martin Dontsop Nguezet
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture
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Serge Amato Masirika
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture
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Akonkwa Nyamuhirwa Dieu-Merci
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture
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Jacob Mignouna
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture
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Abstract

Soil erosion is part of significant factors that trigger or sustain land degradation, limiting agricultural productivity in the Eastern DR Congo. For years, research and development institutions disseminated a range of soil conservation practices (SCPs) meant to reduce erosion’s fallout in the region. Since the said SCPs recorded a low rate of adoption, this study was carried out, with the purpose of assessing factors influencing farmers’ adoption, regarding some of the involved SCPs. A random sample – made up of 500 households – was selected across the target territories in the South-Kivu Province, more specifically in Kabare, Walungu, and Mwenga. Empirical evidence shows that access to information-related factors (such as extension services and group membership), institutional factors (access to loans), and behavioral factors (farmers’ perception about soil erosion) were identified as primary drivers behind SCPs adoption. It appears that adoption of SCPs is constrained by the lack of given conducive means/settings (i.e. land tenure security, adequate cash, farming tools, and training). The surveys also asserted that farmers’ motivation for adoption increases in line with their level of awareness of soil erosion issues. These findings point to the need to put up locality management committee(s), as collective spaces for availing a conducive environment, based on the identified adoption’s drivers, to overcome the identified constraints, and increase/further awareness of soil erosion implications.