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COEVOLUTION WITH SPATIALLY STRUCTURED RICE LANDRACES MAINTAINS MULTIPLE GENERALIST LINEAGES IN THE RICE BLAST PATHOGEN
  • +14
  • Sajid Ali,
  • Pierre Gladieux,
  • Sébastien Ravel,
  • Henri Adreit,
  • Isabelle Meunier,
  • Joëlle Milazzo,
  • Sandrine Cros-Arteil,
  • Francois Bonnot,
  • Baihui Jin,
  • Thomas Dumartinet,
  • Florian Charriat,
  • Alexandre Lassagne,
  • Hiahong He,
  • Didier Tharreau,
  • Huichuan Huang,
  • Jean-Benoit Morel,
  • Elisabeth Fournier
Sajid Ali
Hazara University, Mansehra

Corresponding Author:bioscientist122@yahoo.com

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Pierre Gladieux
PHIM Plant Health Institute, Univ Montpellier, INRAE
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Sébastien Ravel
CIRAD Departement Systemes biologiques
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Henri Adreit
CIRAD
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Isabelle Meunier
CIRAD, UMR PHIM
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Joëlle Milazzo
CIRAD
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Sandrine Cros-Arteil
University of Montpellier, INRAE, CIRAD, Montpellier SupAgro
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Francois Bonnot
CIRAD, UMR PHIM
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Baihui Jin
Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming
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Thomas Dumartinet
CIRAD Departement Systemes biologiques
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Florian Charriat
CIRAD, UMR PHIM
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Alexandre Lassagne
CIRAD, UMR PHIM
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Hiahong He
Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming
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Didier Tharreau
CIRAD
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Huichuan Huang
Yunnan Agricultural University
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Jean-Benoit Morel
CIRAD
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Elisabeth Fournier
Universite de Montpellier
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Abstract

Traditional agrosystems, where humans, crops and microbes have coevolved over long periods, can serve as models to understand the eco-evolutionary determinants of disease dynamics and help the engineering of durably resistant agrosystems. Here, we investigated the genetic and phenotypic relationship between rice (Oryza sativa) landraces and their rice blast pathogen (Pyricularia oryzae) in the traditional Yuanyang terraces of flooded rice paddies in China, where rice landraces have been grown and bred over centuries without significant disease outbreaks. Analyses of genetic subdivision revealed that indica rice plants clustered according to landrace names. Three new diverse lineages of rice blast specific to the Yuanyang terraces coexisted with lineages previously detected at the worldwide scale. Population subdivision in the pathogen population did not mirror pattern of population subdivision in the host. Measuring the pathogenicity of rice blast isolates on landraces revealed generalist life histories. Our results suggest that the implementation of disease control strategies based on the emergence or maintenance of a generalist lifestyle in pathogens may sustainably reduce the burden of disease in crops.
13 Jan 2023Submitted to Molecular Ecology
20 Jan 2023Assigned to Editor
20 Jan 2023Submission Checks Completed
20 Jan 2023Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
23 Jan 2023Reviewer(s) Assigned