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Transesophageal Echocardiographic Findings of Mitral Valve Prolapse in a Heart Model Established with the Mimics/3-matic Software
  • Jun Meng,
  • Yun Chen
Jun Meng
Changzhou First People's Hospital

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Yun Chen
Changzhou First People's Hospital
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Abstract

Background: Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common disease that affects the valve between the left heart chambers. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) helps locate mitral regurgitant defects in patients with MVP. We encountered an unusual phenomenon when performing TEE in a 67-year-old male patient with MVP. The three-dimensional (3D) TEE showed a regurgitant defect in C1. However, both the 77° and 100° two-dimensional (2D) TEE views detected severe mitral regurgitation at the regurgitant defect. Methods: To explain this phenomenon, we utilized the data of a 45-year-old male patient who complained of chest distress and underwent cardiac computed tomographic angiography for diagnostic purposes. Subsequently, we established a heart model using the Mimics/3-matic software. In 3-matic, we simulated the TEE process, which included acquiring the transducer location, the transducer direction, and the 77° and 100° TEE views. Results: During the TEE process, the center of the transducer was placed at P8. If the transducer was toward with a multiplane transducer angle of 77°, C1 was evaluated via 2D TEE. If it was toward at 100°, C1 was assessed again via 2D TEE. The coordinates of P12 and P12’ were extremely close to each other. Conclusion: The phenomenon could be likely explained as follows: For a certain transducer location, the transducer might have two different directions, where the same anterior commissure could be accurately observed at two different multiplane transducer angles. These two directions were extremely close to each other. When TEE was performed in the patient with MVP, the transducer was in fact turned from one direction to the other without being realized.