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Residual stress evolution analysis of camshaft considering manufacturing-service processes
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  • Xiaoxiang Bai,
  • Zhicheng Peng,
  • Guochao Li,
  • Honggen Zhou,
  • Jianzhi Chen,
  • Chongshun Tian,
  • Shuhao Guo
Xiaoxiang Bai
Jiangsu University of Science and Technology

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Zhicheng Peng
Jiangsu University of Science and Technology
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Guochao Li
Jiangsu University of Science and Technology
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Honggen Zhou
Jiangsu University of Science and Technology
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Jianzhi Chen
Jiangsu University of Science and Technology
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Chongshun Tian
Jiangsu University of Science and Technology
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Shuhao Guo
Jiangsu University of Science and Technology
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Abstract

Neglecting the influence of residual stress often leads to inaccurate predictions of camshaft life. Understanding residual stress evolution (RSE) under cyclic loading is the foundation for accurately predicting the fatigue life of camshafts. Camshafts are not subjected to uniform residual stress during manufacture, nor do they experience an evenly distributed load in service. Because studying the RSE of camshafts in service using only experiments is not practical, a combination of FEA (finite element analysis) and experimental verification is used. It is difficult for FEA to accurately predict the ratchet behavior of the stress and strain of a camshaft in service. To address this issue, our study proposes an experimentally-verified cyclic-plastic constitutive model that considers mixed hardening coupled damage (CDMH). RSE that is observed during camshaft manufacture and service is discussed. The results demonstrate that the CDMH model can accurately predict the RSE of camshaft in service, with an error less than 6.23%. We noticed that the compressive residual stress generated in the manufacturing process is enhanced and redistributed during service. The first cyclic load has the greatest contribution to the stress enhancement effect; the smaller the camshaft residual stress in the manufacturing process, the larger is the increased amplitude under the same load. The residual stress on the cam profile can be increased at least 6.02% by swing grinding, when compared with cutting grinding. This study provides a method for exploring RSE in camshafts under cyclic loading.