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STATINS EFFECT ON ONCOLOGIC OUTCOME IN LARYNX SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA: A COMMENTARY ON OUR CLINICAL EXPERIENCE
  • +3
  • federica zoccali,
  • Marco de Vincentiis,
  • andrea colizza,
  • stefano cicala,
  • antonio greco,
  • Massimo Fusconi
federica zoccali
University of Rome La Sapienza Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry
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Marco de Vincentiis
University of Rome La Sapienza Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry
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andrea colizza
University of Rome La Sapienza Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry
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stefano cicala
Agenzia Nazionale per i Servizi Sanitari Regionali
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antonio greco
University of Rome La Sapienza Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry
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Massimo Fusconi
University of Rome La Sapienza Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry
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Abstract

Purpose: Some studies have suggested a protective role of statins in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) even though the real contribution of statins to morbidity and survival remains unclear. Study Design: Retrospective case-control Methods: The aim of this review is to retrospectively evaluate the oncological protection and the outcome of the statin intake in a population of patients affected by larynx squamous cell carcinoma that underwent total or partial laryngectomy. We analyzed 109 patients with a focus on the percentage of statin intake. Overall survival (OS) was compared between patients underwent total or partial laryngectomy assuming statin or not. Furthermore, we compare statin intake in cancer patients with a population of non-cancer patients. We analyzed if statin intake could be statistically significant in increasing the overall survival. Results: The Kaplan-Meier survival curves for oncologic population assuming statins was 94,7% and 78% for patients that were not assuming statins. The Cox multivariate regression analysis didn’t identify a statistically significant OS benefit with statin intake Conclusion: Statin intake at the time of diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx has shown an improved OS even though statin consumption didn’t appear as a statistically significant variable probably due to the small number of patients analyzed. Another probable cause is the feedback of a medium delay of about ten years in statin assumption compared to the onset of the tumor and the emerged data of a smaller percentage of people assuming statins from the population analyzed, compared to the national medium.