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Drug use and severe outcomes among adults hospitalized with influenza, 2016-2019
  • +18
  • Christina Parisi,
  • Kimberly Yousey-Hindes,
  • Rachel Holstein,
  • Alissa O'Halloran,
  • pam kirley,
  • Nisha Alden,
  • Evan Anderson,
  • Sue Kim,
  • Melissa McMahon,
  • Sarah Khanlian,
  • Nancy Spina,
  • Maria Gaitan,
  • Eli Shiltz,
  • Ann Thomas,
  • William Schaffner,
  • Keipp Talbot,
  • Melanie Crossland,
  • Robert Cook,
  • Shikha Garg,
  • James Meek,
  • James Hadler
Christina Parisi
University of Florida
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Kimberly Yousey-Hindes
Yale University School of Public Health
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Rachel Holstein
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Alissa O'Halloran
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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pam kirley
California Emerging Infections Program
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Nisha Alden
Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment
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Evan Anderson
Emory University School of Medicine
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Sue Kim
Michigan Department of Health and Human Services
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Melissa McMahon
Minnesota Department of Health
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Sarah Khanlian
New Mexico Department of Health
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Nancy Spina
New York State Department of Health
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Maria Gaitan
University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
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Eli Shiltz
Ohio Department of Health
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Ann Thomas
Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division
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William Schaffner
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
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Keipp Talbot
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
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Melanie Crossland
Salt Lake County Health Department
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Robert Cook
University of Florida
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Shikha Garg
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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James Meek
Yale University School of Public Health
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James Hadler
Yale University School of Public Health
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Abstract

Background: Influenza is a persistent public health problem associated with severe morbidity and mortality. Drug use is related to myriad health complications, but the relationship between drug use and severe influenza outcomes is not well understood. The study objective was to evaluate the relationship between drug use and severe influenza-associated outcomes. Methods: Data were collected by the Influenza Hospitalization Surveillance Network (FluSurv-NET) from the 2016-2017 through 2018-2019 influenza seasons. Among persons hospitalized with influenza, descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used to analyze differences in demographic characteristics, risk and behavioral factors, and severe outcomes (intensive care unit [ICU] admission, mechanical ventilation, or death) between people who used drugs (PWUD), defined as having documented drug use within the past year, and non-PWUD. Results: Among 48,430 eligible hospitalized influenza cases, 2,019 were PWUD and 46,411 were non-PWUD. PWUD were younger than non-PWUD and more likely to be male, non-Hispanic Black or Hispanic/Latino, smoke tobacco, abuse alcohol, and have chronic conditions including asthma, chronic liver disease, chronic lung disease, or immunosuppressive conditions. PWUD had greater odds of ICU admission and mechanical ventilation, but not death compared with non-PWUD. Opioid use specifically was associated with increased risk of ICU admission and mechanical ventilation. Conclusion: PWUD had greater odds of ICU admission and mechanical ventilation than non-PWUD hospitalized with influenza. These results support targeted initiatives to prevent influenza and associated severe outcomes among this population.
21 Aug 2022Submitted to Influenza and other respiratory viruses
22 Aug 2022Assigned to Editor
22 Aug 2022Submission Checks Completed
22 Aug 2022Editorial Decision: Revise Minor
26 Aug 20221st Revision Received
26 Aug 2022Submission Checks Completed
26 Aug 2022Assigned to Editor
26 Aug 2022Editorial Decision: Accept