loading page

Wild canids and ecological traps, facing deforestation and climate change in the Amazon Rainforest
  • +7
  • Geovana Oliveira,
  • Paulo Trindade,
  • Iara Santos,
  • Paula Almeida-Maués,
  • Fernando Carvalho,
  • Daniel Paiva Silva,
  • Nelson Pinto,
  • Øystein Wiig,
  • Leonardo Sena,
  • Ana Cristina Mendes-Oliveira
Geovana Oliveira
Federal University of Para
Author Profile
Paulo Trindade
Federal University of Para
Author Profile
Iara Santos
Federal University of Para
Author Profile
Paula Almeida-Maués
Universidade Federal do Para
Author Profile
Fernando Carvalho
Federal University of Para
Author Profile
Daniel Paiva Silva
Instituto Federal de Educacao Ciencia e Tecnologia Goiano - Campus Urutai
Author Profile
Nelson Pinto
Secretaria de Estado de Educação, Goiania, Goiás
Author Profile
Øystein Wiig
University of Oslo
Author Profile
Leonardo Sena
Federal University of Para
Author Profile
Ana Cristina Mendes-Oliveira
Federal University of Para
Author Profile

Abstract

Ecological traps occur when species choose to settle in lower quality habitats, even if this reduces their survival or productivity. This normally occurs in situations of drastic environmental changes, resulting, for example, from anthropogenic pressures. In the medium and long term, this could mean the extinction of the species. We investigated the dynamics of occurrence and distribution of three canid species (Atelocynus microtis, Cerdocyon thous, and Spheotos venaticus) related to human threats imposed on their habitats in the Amazon Rainforest. We analyzed the possible environmental thresholds for the occurrence of these species and confronted them with the future projections of climatic niches for each one. All three species will be negatively affected by climate change in the future, with losses of up to 91% of the suitable area of occurrence in the Brazilian Amazon. The occurrence of C. thous and S. venaticus has been positively influenced by anthropogenic open areas to the detriment of native environments, suggesting that these species are being attracted by ecological traps, which may put them at risk in the future in the Amazon Region. The A. microtis species is the most dependent on forest habitats, and thus the most significant threat would be forest loss. Using the canid species as a model, we could deeply investigate these ecological effects that can affect a large part of the Amazonian fauna in the current scenario. Considering the high degree of environmental degradation and deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest, the theory of ecological traps must be discussed at the same level that habitat loss is considered a decisive criterion of threat to biodiversity.
13 Jun 2022Assigned to Editor
13 Jun 2022Submission Checks Completed
14 Jun 2022Reviewer(s) Assigned
20 Jul 2022Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
22 Jul 2022Editorial Decision: Revise Minor