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Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) among Hong Kong Chinese Childhood Cancer Survivors
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  • Ka Yan Ho,
  • Katherine Ka Wai Lam,
  • Joyce Oi Kwan Chung,
  • Wei Xia,
  • Laurie Long Kwan Ho,
  • Ankie Tan Cheung ,
  • Sau Ying Chiu,
  • Godfrey Chi Fung Chan ,
  • Ho Cheung William Li
Ka Yan Ho
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Corresponding Author:[email protected]

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Katherine Ka Wai Lam
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
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Joyce Oi Kwan Chung
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
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Wei Xia
The University of Hong Kong
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Laurie Long Kwan Ho
The University of Hong Kong
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Ankie Tan Cheung
The University of Hong Kong
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Sau Ying Chiu
Hospital Authority
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Godfrey Chi Fung Chan
University of Hong Kong
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Ho Cheung William Li
The University of Hong Kong
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Abstract

Background Sleep disruption is prevalent in childhood cancer survivors. However, no validated instrument is available to assess this symptom. We translated and adapted the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for Hong Kong Chinese cancer survivors and examined its psychometric properties and factor structure. Procedure A cross-sectional study was conducted. A convenience sample of 402 Hong Kong Chinese childhood cancer survivors aged 6–18 years were asked to complete the Chinese version of the PSQI, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale for Children (CES-DC), Fatigue Scale-Child (FS-C)/Fatigue Scale-Adolescent (FS-A), and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL). To assess known-group validity, 50 pediatric cancer patients and 50 healthy counterparts were recruited. A sample of 40 survivors was invited to respond to the PSQI again 2 weeks later to assess test–retest reliability. Results The Chinese version of the PSQI had a Cronbach alpha of 0.71, with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.90. Childhood cancer survivors showed significantly lower mean PSQI scores than children with cancer, and significantly higher mean scores than healthy counterparts. We observed positive correlations between PSQI and CES-DC scores and between PSQI and FS-A/FS-C scores, but a negative correlation between PSQI and PedsQL scores. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the translated PSQI data best fit a three-factor model. The best cutoff score to detect insomnia was 4.5. Conclusions The Chinese version of the PSQI is a reliable and valid instrument to assess subjective sleep quality among Hong Kong Chinese childhood cancer survivors.
Dec 2021Published in Health and Quality of Life Outcomes volume 19 issue 1. 10.1186/s12955-021-01803-y