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Gamma-glutamyl-transferase may predict COVID-19 outcomes in hospitalized patients
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  • Ahmet Yozgat,
  • benan kasapoglu,
  • Alpaslan Tanoğlu,
  • Güray Can,
  • Yusuf Serdar Sakin,
  • Murat Kekilli
Ahmet Yozgat
Ufuk Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi
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benan kasapoglu
Lokman Hekim University
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Alpaslan Tanoğlu
Sancaktepe Şehit Prof Dr Ilhan Varank Training and Research Hospital
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Güray Can
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Yusuf Serdar Sakin
Ankara Gulhane Egitim ve Arastirma Hastanesi
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Murat Kekilli
Gazi University
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Abstract

Aim: In this study, we aimed to define the predictive role of liver function tests at admission to the hospital in outcomes of hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Material and Method: In this multicentric retrospective study, a total of 269 adult patients (≥18 years of age) with confirmed COVID-19 who were hospitalized for the treatment were enrolled. Demographic features, complete medical history, and laboratory findings of the study participants at admission were obtained from the medical records. Patients were grouped regarding their ICU requirements during their hospitalization periods. Results: Among all 269 participants, 106 were hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) and 66 died. The patients hospitalized in ICU were older than patients hospitalized in wards (p=0.001) and expired patients were older than alive patients (p=0.001). Age, elevated serum D-dimer, creatinine, and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) levels at admission were independent factors predicting ICU hospitalization and mortality in COVID-19 patients. Conclusion: In conclusion, in hospitalized patients with COVID-19, laboratory data on admission, including serum, creatinine, GGT and d-dimer levels have an important predictive role for the ICU requirement and mortality. Since these tests are readily available in all hospitals and inexpensive, some predictive formulas may be calculated with these parameters at admission, to define the patients requiring intensive care.

Peer review status:IN REVISION

01 Aug 2021Submitted to International Journal of Clinical Practice
02 Aug 2021Assigned to Editor
02 Aug 2021Submission Checks Completed
19 Aug 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
08 Sep 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
08 Sep 2021Editorial Decision: Revise Major
23 Sep 20211st Revision Received