loading page

The Impact of Movement, Physical Activity and Position on Urine Production: A Pilot Study
  • +3
  • Mutlu Deger,
  • Vansh Kapila,
  • Marie Astrid Denys,
  • Ibrahim Aridogan,
  • Karel Everaert,
  • François Hervé
Mutlu Deger
Cukurova University Faculty of Medicine
Author Profile
Vansh Kapila
Ghent University Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Author Profile
Marie Astrid Denys
Ghent University
Author Profile
Ibrahim Aridogan
Cukurova University Faculty of Medicine
Author Profile
Karel Everaert
Universitair Ziekenhuis Gent
Author Profile
François Hervé
Universitair Ziekenhuis Gent
Author Profile

Abstract

Background: Many different internal factors have been proven to influence urine production such as age, weight, and quality of sleep. External factors such as consumption of caffeine and fluid consumption have been shown to have an impact on urine production. Aim: To investigate the impact of movement, physical activity, and position on urine production. Methods: This prospective observational study was executed at Ghent University Hospital, Belgium. Study participation was open for anyone visiting the hospital. Participants collected 1 basic and 2 extended 24-hour urine collections and filled in questionnaires concerning their general health and physical activity. Urinary levels of osmolality, sodium, and creatinine were determined. Data on movement, physical activity and position was described. Results: An increase in body movement leads to a significant increase in diuresis during daytime, night-time, and 24 hours (p=0,002, p= <0,001, and p=<0,001, respectively). An increase in body movement leads to a significant decrease in osmolality during night-time and 24 hours (p=0,009, and p=0,004, respectively). However, no significant influence of movement on osmolality was found during daytime (p=0,12). An increase in body movement leads to a significant decrease in creatinine during daytime, night-time, and 24 hours (p=0,001, <0,001, and p=<0,001, respectively). An increase in body movement leads to a significant increase in sodium during daytime (p=0,046) but this was statistically significant during night-time and 24 hours (p=0,32, and p=0,84 respectively). Conclusion: Our study demonstrates a statistically significant association of movement, physical activity, and position with urine production. It would therefore be interesting to explore this association further with the use of new technology to have more accurate data. Here lays a potential role for conservative measurements and lifestyle adaptations in the management of patients with bothersome LUTS and more precisely nocturia.

Peer review status:ACCEPTED

25 Jul 2021Submitted to International Journal of Clinical Practice
26 Jul 2021Assigned to Editor
26 Jul 2021Submission Checks Completed
11 Aug 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned
17 Aug 2021Review(s) Completed, Editorial Evaluation Pending
20 Aug 2021Editorial Decision: Accept