loading page

Genetic structure of spotted alfalfa aphid Therioaphis trifolii (Hemiptera: Aphididae) populations in China inferred from complete mitochondrial genomes
  • +5
  • Xinzhi Liu,
  • Shu Wei,
  • Zhenyong Du,
  • Jia He,
  • Xinyue Zhang,
  • Hu Li,
  • Rong Zhang,
  • Wanzhi Cai
Xinzhi Liu
China Agricultural University College of Plant Protection
Author Profile
Shu Wei
Academy of Ningxia Agriculture and Forestry Science
Author Profile
Zhenyong Du
China Agricultural University College of Plant Protection
Author Profile
Jia He
Academy of Ningxia Agriculture and Forestry Science
Author Profile
Xinyue Zhang
China Agricultural University College of Plant Protection
Author Profile
Hu Li
China Agricultural University College of Plant Protection
Author Profile
Rong Zhang
Ningxia Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Science
Author Profile
Wanzhi Cai
China Agricultural University College of Plant Protection
Author Profile

Abstract

Biological invasions represent a natural rapid evolutionary process in contemporary time scale, and the invasive species may present a major threat to biodiversity and ecosystem integrity. Analyzing the genetic structure and demographic history of invasive populations is critical for the effective management of invasive species. The spotted alfalfa aphid (SAA) Therioaphis trifolii is indigenous in the Mediterranean region of Europe and Africa and has invaded other continents, causing severe damages to the alfalfa industry; however, little is known about its genetic structure and invasion history. In this study, we obtained 167 complete mitochondrial genome sequences from 23 SAA populations across China based on high-throughput sequencing and performed population genetic and phylogenomic analyses. High haplotype diversity and low nucleotide diversity were found in SAA populations in China with distinct genetic structures, i.e., all population samples diverged into three phylogenetic lineages with possible different invasion sources. Demographic history analyses showed a recent expansion of the SAA population, consistent with the rapid invasion history. Our study supported that SAA populations in China were possibly derived from multiple introduction events through commercial trades of alfalfa.