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Industrial By-Products for the Rehabilitation of Coal Mining-Affected Areas -- a Novel Approach
  • +2
  • Arkadiusz Bauerek,
  • Jean Diatta,
  • Łukasz Pierzchała,
  • Alicja Krzemień,
  • Angelika Więckol-Ryk
Arkadiusz Bauerek
Central Mining Institute
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Jean Diatta
Poznan University of Life Sciences
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Łukasz Pierzchała
Central Mining Institute
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Alicja Krzemień
Central Mining Institute
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Angelika Więckol-Ryk
Central Mining Institute
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Abstract

The blends of coal combustion by-products (CCBs) with organic wastes (sewage sludge and spent mushroom compost) were investigated for elaboration of soil substitutes for land rehabilitation of coal mine affected areas. The study incudes four types four types of habitat with different water retention and fertility i.e.: dry and moderate fertility (A1-A3), mesic and low fertility (B1-B3), mesic and moderate fertility (C1-C3), humid and low fertility (D1-D3). Obtained results revealed that the amounts of macronutrients were sufficient for supporting plant growth i.e.: N (0.44-0.60 %), P (0.13-021 %), K (1.63-1.98 %), Mg (1.01-1.38 %), Ca (5.32-8.23 %), S (2.66-4.12 %), whereas the concentration of organic matter varied within the range 20.3-27.9 %. Phytotest using white mustard (Sinapis alba) seeds under laboratory conditions showed that the best results of sprouting i.e: 56 and 66 % were obtained for D2 and D3, respectively. The values of pH (8.16-8.78) and electrical conductivity (5.28-6.73 mS·cm-1) of tested soil substitutes were found to be the decisive factors limiting the germination process. The coefficients between the parameters of soil substitutes and the Sinapis alba sproutings have revealed negative correlation with electrical conductivity (r = -0.46). Additionally, tests with meadow vegetation gave promising opportunity for the use of soil substitutes in the process of land rehabilitation. The cover of the mesic and dry meadow vegetation reached 90%. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has outlined that pH, content of P and organic matter, are the most important factors that influence cover of meadow vegetation.